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3526351873_bec2cbd95c_o_lepiaf_ntbc.geo_commercial_warm silver_cLearning How to Walk

Sara Eckel of the New York Times discusses motion correction, a new trend in injury prevention.  In particular, the article speaks about the growing community of people looking to diagnosis and correct issues with their natural walking gait.

Sara Eckel – New York Times

This article was selected by Moji because of its relevant content.  We have crafted an overview, but please link directly to their site to read the entire article.

MOJI OVERVIEW:

Sara Eckel of the New York Times discusses a new trend in injury prevention – motion correction.  More and more individuals are seeking help from fitness professionals and medical doctors to ensure that they are employing proper biomechanics in everything from jumping to heavy lifting.  This article speaks to a growing community of people looking to diagnosis and correct issues with their natural walking gait.  Eckel interviews attendees at a Brooklyn yoga class led by instructor Jonathan FitzGordon to learn their motivations for learning to walk late in life and the results they’ve seen.  Breaking  a 30 or 40 year old habit is not an easy endeavor.  However, Eckel suggests that the benefits may be well worth the effort.

By Sara Eckel

Published: November 11, 2008

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The New York Times

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2846216148_b53a9af9ac_a4gpa_sharealikeChronic Static Stretching Improves Exercise Performance

This study investigated the influence of static stretching exercises on specific exercise performances.

39(10):1825-1831, October 2007.

MEDICINE & SCIENCE IN SPORTS & EXERCISE

KOKKONEN, JOKE 1; NELSON, ARNOLD G. 2; ELDREDGE, CAROL 1; WINCHESTER, JASON B. 2

Static stretching exercises can improve specific exercise performances.  The study group performing static stretching had significant average improvements for flexibility, standing long jump, vertical jump, sprint, knee extension, knee flexion endurance and knee extension endurance.

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3775578653_5c84c7a26e_lululemon athletica_commercial_wanderlust festivalFlexibility: Loosen Up

Jim and Phil Wharton from Runner’s World discuss the importance of improving flexibility for runners. ROME or Range of Motion Exercises can help you improve your performance and make you less injury-prone.

Jim & Phil Wharton – Runner’s World

This article was selected by Moji because of its relevant content.  We have crafted an overview, but please link directly to their site to read the entire article.

MOJI OVERVIEW:

Runners typically tend to focus on training programs that build their endurance and speed. However, improving flexibility is also very important.  Range of Motion exercises will not only help with your performance, but will also build strength, endurance, and help prevent injuries. The program should be done before and after a run.

By Jim and Phil Wharton

Runner’s World

Published: August, 2004

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312460560_7283b192cb_kamaruBuild Stronger Lower Legs

The author, Ted Spiker, from Runner’s World provides six specific exercises/stretches that will help runners recover more quickly from lower leg pain and injury.

Ted Spiker – Runner’s World

This article was selected by Moji because of its relevant content.  We have crafted an overview, but please link directly to their site to read the entire article.

MOJI OVERVIEW:

The article includes six specific exercises/stretches that will help runners recover more quickly from lower leg pain/injury. The author provides illustrations as well easy-to-follow descriptions of the movements and their targeted areas.

By Ted Spiker

Runner’s World

Published: March 7, 2007

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2482351656_6bcb9e0d3c_b_Unlisted Sightings_noderivatives_runWhen Good Knees Go Bad

Paul Scott, writes about how he became obsessed with the mechanics of the human knee after his own personal experience with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

Paul Scott – Runner’s World

This article was selected by Moji because of its relevant content.  We have crafted an overview, but please link directly to their site to read the entire article.

MOJI OVERVIEW:

The author and avid runner, Paul Scott, writes about how he became obsessed with the mechanics of the human knee after his own personal experience with patellofemoral pain syndrome, also known as anterior knee pain.  After Mr. Scott set out to prove that all knees are worthless, he ended up realizing that the human knee is actually brilliantly designed. He embarked on a knee-knowledge mission, speaking with several orthopedic surgeons throughout the country who specialize in knee surgery and sports medicine to discuss not only the physiology of the knee, but also the different theories about the source of knee pain.  For knee pain, Mr. Scott recommends icing twice a day until pain subsides, using bracing if necessary, resting and then gradually returning to running.  He also recommends strengthening the core, quads, and leg muscles.

By: Paul Scott

Runner’s World

Published: February 16, 2007

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