Triathletes, on Your Mark…Whoa!

1362916143_1c140efde7_b_eric.surfdude_commercial_perfect conditionsTriathletes, on Your Mark…Whoa!

This article by Sean Hamill of The New York Times refutes the common claim that training for a triathlon reduces risk of injury.

Sean D. Hamill – The New York Times

This article was selected by Moji because of its relevant content.  We have crafted an overview, but please link directly to their site to read the entire article.

Moji Overview:

With triathlons booming in popularity, the prevalence of training-related injuries is on the rise.  This article by Sean Hamill of The New York Times refutes the common claim that training for a triathlon reduces risk of injury.  While switching up activities can reduce overuse injuries by utilizing a broader rage of muscle sets, most triathletes incorporate training for the three disciplines  in addition to rather than in substitution for their current training schedules.  This increased workload results in most athletes overtraining and becoming prone to serious overuse injuries from doing too much, too soon. Hamill states in his article that newbie triathletes are particularly prone to injury as they radically ramp up their athletic involvement while trying to navigate new sports.  Whether from a spill on the bike or a stress fracture from an overly aggressive running program, doctors are reporting the increased incidence of novice triathletes coming to their office in need of therapy, surgery, and rest.  However, newbies aren’t the only ones suffering.  All triathletes are exposed to wealth of injuries associated with swimming, cycling, and running as well as the rigors of a heavy training program.  Moreover, the temptation to overtrain affects experienced triathletes as well. By Sean D. Hamill Published:  November 24, 2009 Read the Article The New York Times

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